Primus Tupike Camp Stove Review  

The Highest Gear Forager Score which is a lit match

96% Gear Forager Score

The Primus Tupike camp stove review finds that it isn’t just fun to say, it’s a highly functional premium camp stove. Reviewers enjoyed the sleek styling and high-end materials that hold up to repeated packing and unfolding. They also noted the lack of maintenance required and the dependable ignition. It’s not ideal for backpacking trips because of its size and weight, making the Primus Tupike ideal for car camping. The stable flame and even cooking come with an elevated price tag but it’s easy to see where that extra money goes.

The Highest Gear Forager Score which is a lit match

96% Gear Forager Score

The Primus Tupike camp stove review finds that it isn’t just fun to say, it’s a highly functional premium camp stove. Reviewers enjoyed the sleek styling and high-end materials that hold up to repeated packing and unfolding. They also noted the lack of maintenance required and the dependable ignition. It’s not ideal for backpacking trips because of its size and weight, making the Primus Tupike ideal for car camping. The stable flame and even cooking come with an elevated price tag but it’s easy to see where that extra money goes.

Primus Tupike Camp Stove Expert Reviews

Expedition Portal says:

“Unlike the majority of two-burners on the market which are far larger than they really need to be, the Tupike is sleek, thin, and space efficient. At only 3.5-inches thick it slips into tight spaces that normally wouldn’t accommodate a full size stove.

The two 7,000 BTU burners are made of stainless steel with independent piezo-electric ignitors. The pot supports are large, stable, and easily removed to facilitate cleaning. Many stoves require the removal of the burner to detach the drip trays, but the Tupike’s lower tray lifts out with no fuss.”

Wired says:

“Primus’ Tupike stove is compact, lightweight, and well made. The cleverly designed handle makes it simple to pack and carry. It’s also my favorite stove to cook on, thanks to its stainless steel construction and ease of cleaning.

With only 7,000 BTUs, it’s not the fastest at boiling water, but for low-heat cooking—the cooking most of us actually do—it’s unbeatable.

It also performed well in the wind, though the screens sometimes flap around a bit. Unfortunately, this kind of quality does not come cheap.”

Someone cooking on the Primus Tupike camp stove which has two burners and while set up on a table.

Gear Junkie says:

Compared with some others I’ve tested in this price range, it’s among the best I’ve used. The simmer is exceptional, and the piezo sparkers work perfectly with very little pressure.

Overall, this seems like a great choice for serious camp cooks who want a stove that will last. The heavy brass gas fittings appear durable, and the flexible metal gas hose is permanently attached, nesting nicely in the bottom of the stove for storage.

I expect this stove will last campers many years and prepare hundreds of meals in its lifetime.

Popular Mechanics says:

“With a shining stainless-steel body, oak slat accents on the lid and handle, and brass hardware, this is a stove worth showing off.

The built-in ignition system works well and the Tupike’s boiled water in a relatively short amount of time. You get good low-temperature control, which allowed us to cook our mushrooms with only a slight crisping.

The stove is pricey, but has features most others lack. It has a flexible brass hose to connect with a fuel bottle, which makes setup easier.

Two fold-out legs elevate the stove above your cooking area. And it’s versatile; the stove will run off of propane bottles or backpacking fuel canisters.”

Elevation Outdoors says:

“The easy setup of the Primus Tupike makes it very inviting to use. Once you’re cooking, the flames are super responsive and can make preparing a car camping meal seamless and enjoyable.

The griddle option on the stoves means you don’t have to have a pan and also distributes even heat on your meat and vegetables.

Wood slats provide a protective casing around the stainless steal stove when it’s closed up to prevent wear and tear while transporting it and while it’s in storage.”

The Primus Tupike camp stove seen with the top folded down but the stand legs still out showing the wood trim on the top which helps protect the stainless steel from damage.

The Front Runner Wolf Pack might be just the cargo box for you to store your camp kitchen items.

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