Yakima roof top tent set up on a Subaru with the ladder extending down to the ground with a couple looking at a lake and nature behind the vehicle.

Yakima SkyRise Roof Top Tent Review

The lowest Gear Forager Score which is a burned up match.

54% Gear Forager Score

The Yakima SkyRise roof top tent review finds an attractively low price. But, quality and comfort issues did catch the reviewers attention. The roof top tent market is a competitive space, so everything counts. Yakima is going back to the drawing board for a refresh with expected improvements.

The lowest Gear Forager Score which is a burned up match.

54% Gear Forager Score

The Yakima SkyRise roof top tent review finds an attractively low price. But, quality and comfort issues did catch the reviewers attention. The roof top tent market is a competitive space, so everything counts. Yakima is going back to the drawing board for a refresh with expected improvements.

Yakima Skyrise Roof Top Tent Expert Reviews

Popular Mechanics says:

“Reviewers appreciated this ease of use and the fact that Yakima built the SkyRise so that you can orient it to open to the side or to the rear of your car, but acknowledged that this comes with some compromises.

Namely, that the tent doesn’t have the widest length adjustment or range of rack compatibility, and that it sits high off the roof, increasing drag and bringing down fuel mileage.

And, one customer on Yakima’s site said he throws an additional memory foam mattress topper on the 2.5-inch-thick one that comes with the tent, saying it reminds him of going to youth camp.”

Outdoor Gear Lab says:

“Durability is not the strongest category for the Skyrise. The 210 D nylon that the canopy is made out of is far from being the toughest material that we’ve seen.

This canopy is great for warmer temps and intermittent use, but if you’re the type of person that puts a beating on your gear, then you might want to go with something stronger.

The rainfly is also only 210 D Nylon, most of the other flys in this review are made from 420 D.”

The Yakima SkyRise roof top tent on top of a vehicle on a white background.

Expedition Portal says:

“For starters, the steel stays used to support the fly were a little tricky to install on the first go. Two of the mounting holes had to be redrilled to accommodate the stays.

I also had the opportunity to test the SkyRise in a windy blow and noticed considerable buffeting. I didn’t fear damage, even with gusts over 2o mph, but it would make for a rough night’s sleep in those conditions.

Also have to report one very minor leak during my rain tests. Despite comprehensive taping of the seams, I found it necessary to seam seal at least one critical band of stitching along the clear window.”

Four Wheeler says:

“The ladder system gave us fits. We didn’t like how it adjusted. The Velcro retaining strap wasn’t strong enough to hold it together when we were unfolding the tent during setup, which allowed the ladder to come crashing down to the ground, impeding tent deployment.

Also, in stronger rains we found that water could enter the tent system. It didn’t happen in lighter rains, and you didn’t wake up with a constant faucet trip on your forehead, but there were wet spots on the foam mattress and sleeping bags. The rainfly could stand to be thicker and better sealed at the seams.”

See how the Yakima Skyrise stacks up against the iKamper SkyCamp 2.0 roof top tent.

Learn more about The Gear Forager Score. Are you ready to forage more gear?